Archive for the ‘Actual Medical Information (Mostly)’ Category

Tofu the Baby Husky Continues to Recover

Wednesday, April 29th, 2015

Neospora!

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I am not good at building up suspense, though it may seem that way because Tofu’s story now has two posts, which is actually because I could not wait to introduce you to him last week! Stay tuned for Part 3 (spoiler alert!), In Which Tofu is Adopted and Lives Happily Ever After.

So, neospora!

Tofu is doing wonderfully. He is happy and loved in his foster home with Gentle Doctor veterinary technician Becky. He is growing stronger every day.

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Is he in pain?

To watch him walk on his unsteady little front legs, it may appear that Tofu is in pain. In fact, on the very first day, we had Tofu on pretty strong pain medication and complete rest, not knowing if his front legs hurt or not. Now we know that his legs do not hurt, they just do not work quite right yet. YET! He is not painful, but he does have mobility issues that continue to improve with medicine, acupuncture, time and love.

Tofu and His Improving Gait!We received his neospora titers back from the laboratory – he is neospora positive!

I have NEVER (as far as I know!) seen a case of neosporosis.

I have NEVER suspected it.

Tofu has it, and he is recovering.

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What is neospora?

Neospora is a parasite that causes abortion in cattle.

Warning – the next part is gross! Don’t you wish I always remembered to warn you??

If a dog eats a portion of an infected calf fetus or placenta or raw beef that is infected, he or she can become infected.

Neospora cysts lodge in the brain of the infected dog. Dogs can pass the parasite to cattle through their feces or to unborn pups in utero, but not otherwise directly to other dogs. Adult cattle do not become clinically ill from neospora and cannot pass it directly to other cattle, except to their unborn offspring.

Here is what we suspect happened to Tofu…His mother, living in a rural area of Nebraska, was exposed to neospora through contact with infected cattle. She may or may not be clinically affected. She passed the infection to Tofu, and most likely his littermates, before birth. Tofu did become sick, developing a head tremor and incoordination that made it impossible to eat or drink on his own and maybe even nurse, and also front limb weakness that progressed to complete inability to use his front legs.

We do not know how the other dogs in Tofu’s family are doing, but someone is checking on them.

The first night Tofu was in the care of Gentle Doctor Animal Hospitals, we started him on clindamycin, an antibiotic that is often effective against neospora in dogs.

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My Oldest Daughter Amanda and Tofu – Love at First Sight!

Ten days later, when Tofu was well on his way to recovery, we had our answer – YES he had been exposed to neospora in his young life. Everything fell into place, including the very scary seizure he had the night before the conformation of the cause of his illness.

He was home with Becky (thank goodness!) and had a generalized seizure. Seizures are NEVER good in puppies, and while they can be caused by very manageable things (like low blood sugar between meals), they can also be caused by some pretty ominous things. In Tofu’s case, his seizure was almost certainly from his neospora infection.

With this condition, signs, including gait abnormalities and seizures, can continue life-long. Space-occupying brain lesions are never good, even those that can be treated. However, because Tofu is making such amazing progress (and to be 100% honest, mostly because I have a good feeling about him), I completely expect him to make a full recovery. Which is good. Because we love him. And also because he will be BIG! If we can end up with a healthy, completely mobile huge dog, that would be ideal!

Are You a Good Puppy with Naughty Moments or a Naughty Puppy with Good Moments?

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Remember last week when I said Tofu is naughty? He is not naughty! That was a direct reference to the one part of his story I could not yet bear to tell you because his other doctor, Dr. Jones, was still so completely mortified that it had happened.

I think that Dr. Jones has recovered, and I hope that she has remembered how very incredible she is, and that these things happen with puppies who eat everything…Neither of us can believe  it has not happened before in all of the years she has done acupuncture!

On the very first part of his very first acupuncture appointment, when he was being watched by two veterinary team members at all times, Tofu ATE A NEEDLE!

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He snuck a tiny needle right out of his tiny furry paw and laughed while everyone panicked. How fun! There were x-rays and endoscopy and updates to Jackie and around the clock poop watch. He was getting even more attention than ever! He did not think that was possible, but he loved it!

The next morning, without so much as a tummy ache, Tofu pooped out the needle, and we all went back to non-panic mode.

He is not a naughty pup as I claimed he was…he is a good pup with one split second, seemingly-naughty-to-us super-fun-to-him normal puppy behavior of what’s-this-I-will-eat-it-that-was-fun that every puppy has. Thank goodness, it all ended well!

Everyone loves Tofu!

THIS is what made me suspect that everyone loves Tofu…The response to his story has been overwhelming! That face! That recovery! I am so in love with him, as is everyone who meets him or hears about him.

THIS is what confirmed that everyone loves Tofu…Dad asked if he had a home yet. Dad! Even Dad loves him! I mean, of course he does. I got my animal loving ways from my awesome Mom and Dad. But Dad is used to thinking about stray kittens I bring home (who live 18 years)…and tiny, tiny Poodles…well, not so much tiny Poodles, as the one and only amazing Ernie Dog. It’s been DECADES since Mom and Dad thought about a dog as big as a Basset…or bigger!

DOES Tofu have a home?

Tofu has LOTS of adoption offers! He has a foster home right now.

You all have been amazing in your outpouring of support to Taysia Blue Husky & Malamute Rescue and Tofu. Please continue to support this awesome rescue group!

Can you foster?

Can you adopt an adult Husky or Malamute?

Can you support the rescuers?

It is an emotionally and physically and financially exhausting deal to be involved in rescue. “How can I help?” is sometimes the most beautiful thing a rescuer hears.

You are an amazing group of Pet Savers. I have loved to see that shine through in this situation almost as much as I have loved holding this little puppy!

I do not know if Tofu has a forever home yet. Taysia Blue Husky & Malamute Rescue will continue to have up-to-date information on Tofu and his adoption status. And when you call or email, remember to ask, “How can I help?”

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Tofu with Gentle Doctor Receptionist Amanda, One of His BFFs!

And if you adopt Tofu, have mercy on us, his veterinary team! We are 100% completely and totally in love with him, and could not bear it if we did not hear once in a while how wonderfully he is doing! I have seen him ONCE this week, and it is breaking my heart! But also, my heart is soaring, knowing he is in an incredible, loving network of capable hands and on the way to a wonderful future. <3

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Love you, kiddo.

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In Which I Lose My Cool at Work for the First Time in Quite Some Time but for a Pretty Good Reason

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014

Jen came to the treatment room on a day not long ago and asked if I could explain the importance of vaccine boosters to a client.

Client education on preventative care?  That is my FAVORITE thing – honestly.

Jen said the client was yelling at Jan and had yelled at her.  Oo that was the opposite of my favorite thing.  That makes me stand in front of my coworkers with my arms folded but ready to punch.  And I am not a puncher.

I went up front and said, “Hey I heard you had some questions.”

The client said she was tired of bringing her puppy in for boosters, and she did not want to bring her for her last leptospirosis booster.

It IS a huge investment – of time, energy and money – to bring a pet for all of their preventative care, especially a puppy or kitten.  So I understood her frustration.  But she wasn’t just annoyed, or even planning to just skip the last set – she wanted us to change our policy, and tell her that what we were saying was important was not actually important.  She was very irate that we would not bend on this – this that is SO important to us.

For much of the team, including myself, wounds are still fresh over recently losing patients to preventable diseases.  After I tried for a bit to explain why each part of preventative care was important, she said “Well, I’m just tired of bringing her in!”

I said, “Wow.”  I left the room with my arms up.  On my way out I said, “Well I am tired of losing patients to lepto!”

I turned the corner into the doctors’ office and slowed down just long enough to find something soft to kick, quietly but firmly kicking the rolling chair…which rolled into a metal kennel, creating a huge crash.  Clearly, I was in no state to be around people, so I stormed outside and paced and muttered.  I stopped and looked up.  Jen and Allison were walking our Shepherd patient in the yard right next to me.  All three of them were staring at me sort of wide-eyed.  “Are you ok?” Jen asked.

I was not.

We have recently lost two patients to leptospirosis.  Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease of dogs and some other mammals – INCLUDING PEOPLE – that is treatable but sometimes fatal.  It is not a common disease in all parts of the country.  It is common in Omaha.  In Omaha, leptospirosis is a core vaccine for dogs.  Because we can vaccinate against lepto, this has become a preventable disease.

In infected dogs, lepto attacks and sometimes shuts down the kidneys and livers of dogs.  It is a horrible disease to have and a horrible way to die.  It is tragic to lose a pet to something that did not need to happen.  As every veterinary team member knows, when you fight hard to save a life, you become so bonded to that patient that if they do pass, a bit of you gets ripped out as well.

It turns out I may have been a wee bit oversensitive at the time I was talking to the puppy’s owner about lepto vaccines.  Jan (and, I suspect, the client) saw the entire ordeal as high spirited banter and was not offended in the least.  That is why they keep Jan up front and me (mostly) in the back.  Jan finished checking out the client and set up her appointment for her final puppy booster.

In this lepto story, everyone won, even the crazy doc.

Dear Client,

I am sorry I was a jerk.  You started it.  I mean…I am sorry.  Your puppy is cute.

Joy the Puppy Hurt Her Knee

Sunday, November 24th, 2013

On and off this year, Joy the Puppy, our four year old Lab X Something, has favored her left hind leg.  She will hold it up  and smile and wag her tail like a Lab with a damaged cruciate ligament, rest on Mom-prescribed Rimadyl and be back to her non-hind leg favoring, smiling, tail wagging self in a matter of days.

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By the fourth or so episode of intermittent hind limb lameness (Kudos to YOU – You ALWAYS bring me your dogs on the FIRST or SECOND episode of lameness), I did a full physical and orthopedic exam and found to no one in the family’s surprise, because I had been saying it for months…Joy had torn her left cruciate ligament.

Nothing Phases Joy

The cruciate (“cross”) ligament is a double band of connective tissue behind the kneecap that stabilizes the long bones of the leg while allowing for all the movements the leg needs to make.  Except for sharp turns of down-hill skiers.  And sharp turns of football players who have already planted their cleats of the shoe holding the foot attached to the leg that is turning.

And dogs with degenerative ligament disease.  And sometimes cats.  Sometimes the cruciate ligament does NOT stabilize the long bones of cats who have degenerative ligament disease.  I have only seen cruciate ligament damage in ONE cat, and he had Cushing’s disease, a condition in which ligaments can be weakened and sometimes…tear.

ANYWAYS, Joy has the dog sort of cruciate damage secondary to degenerative ligament disease of unknown origin.  Yes, she most likely turned like a skier or a football player with two crucial (haha get it?) differences…

1.  In dogs, it is likely that cruciate disease is most often secondary to a degenerative process – It would most likely happen with or without injury.

2.  If the tear was hastened by an injury, Joy PROBABLY did not have an underlying noble cause like dodging a pine tree or catching a ball.  IF she indeed did make one or more tough-on-her-knee moves and IF she had a reason for turning on a dime and IF she could remember and IF she could talk….she would probably say, “it just seemed like it would be fun…and it was!”

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Surgery was scheduled with Dr. Merkley, one of two excellent veterinary surgeons in Omaha.  Dr. Merkley is also my surgery teacher from vet school last century, and I have always enjoyed learning from him and working with him.

Word to the wise – even if you love your surgeon and he is about to do a super cool surgery, ONLY go into the surgical suite with him if the surgery is NOT on your own pet.  Anyways, now I know.

Sleepy Joy

Surgery was about two hours long.  I sat next to Joy on the stretcher after surgery, both of us exhausted, she from her long morning of anesthesia and surgery and I from my long morning of observation and empathy.

Joy's Cool X-Ray

The procedure Joy had done is called a tibial-plateau-leveling osteotomy, or TPLO.

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THANK YOU Doc, for fixing our dog.

THANK YOU Allison, for keeping Joy alive.

THANK YOU Boss, for discounting the portions of Joy’s adventure that were not the actual surgery so severely that I fear you may be as financially beaned by this case as are we.

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Joy is five weeks into recovery, and is doing great.  Client compliance has been an issue.  In fact, she just ran past me…on three legs.  Back to the leash *sigh*

I will never boss you to strictly rest your own pet again without a (even more) kind and (even more) sympathetic I-know-this-sucks comradery, that frankly, I have not felt this strongly since the strict rest I mandated for my own Wuzzy Rat during her recovery from spay surgery.

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It is good for vets to occasionally get a taste of their own medicine, so to speak.

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Joy hated the e collar she had to wear to prevent her from removing her skin staples. Abby continued to add stickers, decorative tape and jewels to cheer her.

Finally Abby painted the whole e collar with pink hearts and a green background.  That seemed to do the trick.

Finally Abby painted the whole e collar with pink hearts and a green background. That seemed to do the trick.

Three more weeks of STRICT rest, then post-recovery radiographs, then back to full activity.  We should be back to neighborhood walks just in time for the huge Christmas snow drifts!  It is a short chapter in a very long life.  I am so grateful that it has gone so well.

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Tidus the Puppy Contracts and Recovers from Parvo

Saturday, November 23rd, 2013

Tidus is my nephew Travis’s Pit Bull puppy.  He is the cutest and sweetest thing I have ever known.

He stopped eating for a day.

Tidus and Travis

He looked MISERABLE.  So did Travis.  My heart broke twice.

Tidus had received one vaccination against parvo disease at 7 weeks of age.  He was now four months old, and projectile vomiting liquid on abdominal palpation and projectile vomiting liquid with the movement it took to gently place him on the scale.

In house testing confirmed that Tidus did indeed have parvo, and it was hitting him hard.  His saving graces were a Dad who got him in quickly and a vet team crazy about puppy survival.

Tidus was hospitalized on aggressive fluid therapy, anti-vomiting medication, pain medication and antibiotics to guard against secondary infections.

Tidus, the lover of all things human and canine, was sentenced to solitary confinement, with minimal handling – and that by a gloved and gowned tech whose heart was breaking because she could not hold him on her lap and tell him all would (probably) be ok, but could only change his line and administer medication and replace his bedding (again) as aseptically as possible, and scrub and bleach after each encounter, to the detriment of her scrubs, socks and shoes, but to the salvation of our other canine patients and her pups at home.

Solitary Confinement Despite Stellar Behavior

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THANK YOU Brooke.

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The team made a decision to give Tidus the warmest, fluffiest bedding we had, knowing full well that the decision was also one to do DAYS of Tidus-only laundry (now with extra bleach!) so that he could have the comfort and love of home, if not the snuggling and attention he was so used to and so craved.

Warms Now, Hugs (and Laundry) Later

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THANK YOU Renée.  THANK YOU Rae-Anne.

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Everyone on the team made concessions so Brooke could handle Tidus for his whole stay, and they all saw all the dogs and all the puppies, and the parvo virus stopped here.  Everyone asked if Tidus was ok and how he was feeling, and everyone gave me the hugs they were wanting to give Tidus, because they knew my stomach hurt too, if only a thousandth of how much Tidus’s stomach hurt, as we all walked the puppy through this together.

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THANK YOU Docs.  THANK YOU Allison and Becky.  THANK YOU team.

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Everyone took care of Travis knowing Tidus is his world, and Grandma swooped so Travis could focus on Tidus’s recovery NOW and deal with the financial side of his illness LATER.

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THANK YOU Travis’s friends.  THANK YOU Travis’s Mom and Grandma and all our family.  You are the best of the best, and I am as proud to be a Finch as I am to be a Nelson.

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Tidus was started on a mild diet on day 2 – oops!  Wow, that was a mistake for sure.  Tidus was started on a mild diet on day THREE.

AND THEN…Tidus ate a bite of i/d canned dog food and did not barf.  He made it outside before he pottied.  His stomach came out of its full-on clench and stayed comfortable and relaxed even with my daily jerk move of deep abdominal palpation.  He lifted his ears and his tail when he saw sweet fourteen year old Ginger, the retired bird dog, playing out in the yard behind the hospital.  “Not today, Tidus,” I whispered.  “Soon.”

My Friend I've Never Met!

And soon did indeed come.  The spark in his eyes is back full force.  No longer can you see his skeleton.  No longer does his head hang down and his stomach tuck.

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Once again, Tidus perpetually looks as if he just told a hilarious joke and wants to jump into your lap to tell it again.  And he does.  I missed you puppy.  I am so very glad you are back kiddo.

NOW is it time? Yes, Tidus, now it is time sweet puppy.

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Some Online Pharmacies are Awesome. Some are not.

Monday, August 5th, 2013

Near the end of March 2011, I was happily researching for my April heartworm post, Happy Heartworm-Free April! when I came across this website:  heartworm-medicine.info.  I e-mailed the site administrator to let him know that dispensing prescription medication without a prescription is illegal.  (Ever the optimist, I was hoping he just did not know…)  His return e-mail (basically) said, no, it isn’t.

My formal complaint to the DEA (Drug Enforcement Agency) and copied to AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association) (basically) said:  He’s not playing fair and someone is going to get hurt!

From the Heartworm Medicine website:  “Can I get non prescription heartworm medicine?  Absolutely. All the heartworm medicines available from here are prescription free. This should make the ordering process much easier for you.”

From the website of the “pharmacy” they use:

  • Choose items and place them in your shopping cart.
  • When you checkout you will be asked to create an account and fill out a brief patient profile.
  • Follow the steps to complete your purchase.
  • Fax or mail the prescription from your Veterinarian to us.
  • Your Veterinarian’s prescription will be reviewed and re-written by a Canadian Veterinarian or Doctor and dispensed by an Independent Pharmacy.

I am usually extremely easygoing.  I can find good and the upside to about anything and anyone.  I can count on both hands my non-negotiables.  Among them,

(1)  the welfare of pets

(2)  the well-being of people

(3)  high ethical standards.

OK, I don’t have many non-negotiables, but I admit, the ones I have are kind of big.

And not that this matters in the least, as far as grand sweeping ideals go, but the heartworm preventatative medications carried in house (which is probably true of many veterinary hospitals) are cheaper than those being offered on this “prescription-free” website.

Veterinary teams really do try to keep costs reasonable for pet owners.  We have pets too!  We know what little money-sucks they can be!

This situation made me so angry!  We have the medical protocols in place that we do for very good reasons.

Here is the basic heartworm prevention program of most veterinary hospitals, and most clients are just fine with it, knowing we are trying really hard to keep their pets safe and to keep costs manageable…

  • Establish a veterinary-owner-pet relationship.
  • Have a wellness examination of the pet done.
  • Have an annual heartworm test done.
  • Choose a safe, effective, pet-specific and weight-specific heartworm preventative medication from a reliable source.
  • Obtain it legally right from the veterinary hospital or an excellent veterinary pharmacy trusted by both the client and the veterinary team.

Pharmacies are NOT the bad guys here…Rule breakers are.  Most pharmacies (including Wedgewood Pharmacy online) do an excellent job partnering with veterinarians to keep pets healthy and safe and provide a much broader range of medical options than we can in-house.

It just made me mad enough to write a strongly worded letter!

Dear Rule Breaker,

Pets, and by association, owners, could be seriously hurt by what you are doing.  It is also unethical.  That’s three strikes.  Do not mess with what is important to me.

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Happy Hide Under the Bed Day!

Monday, July 1st, 2013

I love almost everything about Independence Day.

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Almost.  I literally tear up every time I see, read about or hear about how rattled dogs become at this time of  year.

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Some of it is straight out nervousness or fear – Dogs in general are very sensitive to sound and in general love routine.  This holiday is VERY loud and in Omaha follows an already loud storm season filled with pressure changes to which dogs are also very sensitive.  The loudness of fireworks is also unpredictable and random – which adds to the scariness for dogs.

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Thank you Omaha for making the terrifying portion of the celebration legally longer than one day.  Think of the dogs when you pass legislation!!

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Cats too become frightened – and much of this might apply to them, so take what you need and apply it to your poor scaredy cat too.  However, cats have been practicing all year for this time – if you have set up your home to be cat friendly – and I know you have – each cat has at least one high perch and one low hiding place to which to retreat if need be.

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So that is noise fear.  Annoying, but manageable, yes?

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Some dogs have noise phobia.  This is different.  Or maybe not.  It is more extreme.  It is the difference between someone preferring not to be around crowds or high in the air or ___ and a full blown shutting down crowd or height or ___ phobia.

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Some dogs are not affected at all by the loud noises of storms and fireworks.  If that is your dog, now is the time to be thankful!  Some dogs – maybe most – are on a scale between unaffected and phobic – somewhat fearful of the noises associated with the holiday.

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For those of you with dogs who ARE fearful this time of year, remember…

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You cannot ignore or scold your dog out of a phobia or use a phobic state as a training time or reason a dog out of a full on panic…You CAN and SHOULD love and comfort your dog through a hard time.

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You cannot start training, Thundershirts, music and medications on July 1 and expect them to be 100% effective…You CAN and SHOULD do all of these things anyways – at least the ones that seem to help.

Use the upcoming year to learn as much as you can so that next year storm season and Independence Day will at the worst be tolerable, and at best be boring or even enjoyable for you and your dogs.

You may already KNOW all the things, and it is just as good as it is going to be for  your dog.  Think how hard it would be if he or she did NOT have you!  You are doing a good job, and being near you and having you help them through firework season IS comforting.

Do not feel bad if you have not spent the past two months preparing for this week!  Dogs with phobias are often completely normal between episodes.  Often dogs with noise phobias have no panic attacks between July and July, thank goodness.

Here are some things that I hope will help NOW.  Feel free to add to the list!

Anti-anxiety medication – Call your vet and ask if this may be helpful for your pet.

Exercise

Thundershirts

DAP Spray – a calming pheromone spray for dogs – similar to Feliway for cats

Rescue Remedy

Calming music – I love Through a Dog’s Ear – Here is a free download from their website!

A quiet, safe, maybe dark place – a kennel, a small room, a comforting and familiar rug

Above all, keep your dog INSIDE or on a leash – July 4 is the number one day of the year for losing dogs.

Doggy ear muffs – Oh yeah, someone makes them.

Comfort

Attention

More comfort

Distraction

Puzzles, Kongs, toys

Here are links to things I have written before…with links to things OTHER PEOPLE have written before!

Scared on the Fourth of July

Getting Through the Fireworks

You know, there is nothing new under the sun…except when there is.  What I have learned this year that I did not know before is that using the month or two BEFORE you need a Thundershirt to work with your dog to associate it with happy times – called “coupling” – will make it tons more likely to be helpful, especially long term.  Thank you for that information Dr. Stokes!  I promise to remember that next May!

Thank you so much to friends Alicia Weiland and Janelle Van Riesen for letting me use these pictures of your beautiful pups!

Happy Fourth Everyone!  Let me know how all your brave and hoping-to-be-brave pets do!

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Fuzzy and Wuzzy Rats never struggled with phobias. They were not so much brave as oblivious to anything that was not edible or a toy.

 

 

 

 

 

Happy Heartworm Free October!

Saturday, October 1st, 2011

If you give your pets their heartworm preventative medication on the first, it’s the first!  And, as a friend pointed out, if you do not…it is still the first. :)

Happy October!

GUEST POST!!!! By Russ

I am kind of spoiled.  Shawn (Dr. Finch) takes such amazing care of our pets and keeps really good track of what they need and when, including the heartworm stuff.  I can do the stuff like fill water and food dishes, open the door to let them out or in, play tug with Joy, give lots of pets.  I can do stuff like build scratching posts or steps up to the bed.

I cannot keep track of medicines.  I always have leftovers from prescriptions and can’t get the concept of “daily”  vitamins or taking pills as prescribed, and that is for me!  I am amazed at how my awesome vet and wife can keep track of our pet’s health needs.  I am glad that she does it.

But today, Shawn went to work.  Then we had a birthday party.  At a bowling alley/arcade/laser tag/noisy/crowded place.   Followed by a sleepover.  With cake, ice cream, candy and hyperactive 9 year old girls.   So, while we are both kind of drooling and not focusing our eyes from the party, I have more energy right now.

This is what the party feels like:

http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2011_01_01_archive.html *

So I am reminding you to do your heartworm preventative stuff now, then I am going to do ours.  I guess that what is important is that someone remembers to do it.   Shawn remembered and may need to help me figure it out, but I can do this…I think.

Today’s Checklist:

Noodle the Poodle – Wormshield tablet

Joy the Puppy – Wormshield tablet

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* Permission granted to repost images from Hyperbole and a Half with the website link included.  How cool is that??  Thank you so much!  We appreciate it ALOT.

Happy Heartworm Free September!

Thursday, September 1st, 2011

If you give your pets their heartworm preventative medication on the first, it’s the first!  And, as a friend pointed out, if you do not…it is still the first. :)

Happy September!

Recent Heartworm Related News:

Immiticide, the ONLY approved heartworm disease treatment, is once again unavailable, and Merial does not know when it will be available again.

Read more here:

Treating Heartworm Disease – Another Immiticide Shortage

In response to the Immiticide unavailability, American Heartworm Society published recommendations for veterinarians who have heartworm positive patients waiting for treatment.

Read more here:

Guidance for Heartworm Disease Management During the Adulticide Unavailability

Pfizer modified their recommendations for ProHeart use.  Included in the updates is provision for dogs with allergic dermatitis to receive ProHeart injections.  The recommendation has been changed to “Use with caution in dogs with allergic disease.”

Read more here:

ProHeart 6

We are waiting on confirmation that Revolution for Kittens and Puppies (and they should add, dogs) under five pounds pleases Ernie Dog.

Read more here:

A Story of Ernie Dog

In Finch Family news…

We have decided to switch Joy the Puppy back to Wormshield (oral monthly ivermectin) from ProHeart (injectable twice a year moxidectin) because of her allergic dermatitis (food allergies, recently diagnosed).  I do not think ProHeart made her worse by any means, but I would rather have her on a medication without the known risk of complicating allergic dermatitis!

We have switched Max the Cat’s Revolution application to the 15th, which coincides with Joy and Noodle’s flea and tick topical medication application.  That is neither here nor there, but I did not want you to think poor Max is off of the heartworm preventative checklist.  May it never be!

Today’s Checklist:

Noodle the Poodle – Wormshield tablet

Joy the Puppy – Wormshield tablet

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Happy Heartworm Free August!

Monday, August 1st, 2011

A story of Ernie Dog…

Ernie is my Mom and Dad’s four pound Poodle Dog.  He is my favorite dog in the whole wide world.

When he was a kid, Ernie was on Heartgard Plus.  Ernie loved Heartgard Plus.

One month, Ernie noticed that everyone loved that he loved Heartgard Plus.  He decided not to love it anymore.  When he was given his heartworm prophylaxis, he turned his nose up and said it hurt his feelings that we would offer him something so gross.

So we switched Ernie to Iverhart.  Ernie never liked Iverhart.  He would allow himself to be pilled, but reminded us every month that being pilled hurt his feelings.

And so it went with every flavored oral heartworm prophylaxis on the market.  No medication pleased Ernie.  Most recently he has been on Wormshield, Banfield’s small, flavored oral heartworm prophylaxis.  First as a treat.

No.

Then as a pill…

No.  *sniff*  “Why would you do that to me?”

Then as a powder smashed into peanut butter…

First:  *sniff*  “Why would you do THAT to me?”


Then, *sniff*  “Why would you do that to me AGAIN?” and then… *BARF* and then…sulk.

I could not take hurting the feelings of my Favorite Dog in the Whole Wide World one more time.

Next month, we are starting Ernie Dog on topical Revolution.  I will let you know whether or not Revolution pleases Ernie Dog.

I love you Ernie Dog!  Oo, looks like you need your ears cleaned…

 

Cat Expo

Monday, July 11th, 2011

Saturday’s Cat Expo at Nebraska Humane Society was very fun!  I neither tripped nor drooled, but I did speed talk.  More time for questions!  And there were great questions, many about diets for fat cats, so we should talk more about that here soon.

Kitty Dybdall did a great presentation on cats and litterboxes.  I took notes like crazy – I really think more cats are rehomed because of litterbox issues than anything else.  One of my Life Goals is for every cat owner to get to have their cats for twenty plus years, and their (unintentional) pee antics and their peoples’ (understandable) frustrations are interfering with my Life Goal!

The Nebraska Humane Society team did a great presentation on cat grooming.  They have a handout on nail trimming that I am sure you could get if you need.

The Cat Agility Demonstration was SUPER CUTE!  Two kittens, Oreo and Twizzlers, who have been working (playing) very hard on their skills showed what they had learned on the screened in agility course.  You are very talented, Baby Cats!

My talk was on Common Medical Issues at Different Life Stages.  Even though the audience was composed of very engaged, intelligent cat people with decades of experience, I am pretty sure at one point I said “Cats are super cute.”  Wow.  Cutting edge information.  Oh well.  Very nice group of people, and they had great questions.  Here are links to the articles I gave out after.  If you want printed copies, I have more…Pretty sure I did not lose my train of thought or say “um” in any of the articles :)

Choose Your Own Adventure, Litterbox Edition, Introduction

and

Choose Your Own Adventure, Litterbox Edition

on Riley and James

Forty Things

on Riley and James

Max the Cat

Wuzzy Chronicles, Omaha.net

Thank you for including me in your awesome Cat Expo Nebraska Humane Society!  I hope tons of cats and kittens were adopted!