Posts Tagged ‘cats’

Happy Heartworm Free September!

Thursday, September 1st, 2011

If you give your pets their heartworm preventative medication on the first, it’s the first!  And, as a friend pointed out, if you do not…it is still the first. :)

Happy September!

Recent Heartworm Related News:

Immiticide, the ONLY approved heartworm disease treatment, is once again unavailable, and Merial does not know when it will be available again.

Read more here:

Treating Heartworm Disease – Another Immiticide Shortage

In response to the Immiticide unavailability, American Heartworm Society published recommendations for veterinarians who have heartworm positive patients waiting for treatment.

Read more here:

Guidance for Heartworm Disease Management During the Adulticide Unavailability

Pfizer modified their recommendations for ProHeart use.  Included in the updates is provision for dogs with allergic dermatitis to receive ProHeart injections.  The recommendation has been changed to “Use with caution in dogs with allergic disease.”

Read more here:

ProHeart 6

We are waiting on confirmation that Revolution for Kittens and Puppies (and they should add, dogs) under five pounds pleases Ernie Dog.

Read more here:

A Story of Ernie Dog

In Finch Family news…

We have decided to switch Joy the Puppy back to Wormshield (oral monthly ivermectin) from ProHeart (injectable twice a year moxidectin) because of her allergic dermatitis (food allergies, recently diagnosed).  I do not think ProHeart made her worse by any means, but I would rather have her on a medication without the known risk of complicating allergic dermatitis!

We have switched Max the Cat’s Revolution application to the 15th, which coincides with Joy and Noodle’s flea and tick topical medication application.  That is neither here nor there, but I did not want you to think poor Max is off of the heartworm preventative checklist.  May it never be!

Today’s Checklist:

Noodle the Poodle – Wormshield tablet

Joy the Puppy – Wormshield tablet

See full size image


Cat Expo

Monday, July 11th, 2011

Saturday’s Cat Expo at Nebraska Humane Society was very fun!  I neither tripped nor drooled, but I did speed talk.  More time for questions!  And there were great questions, many about diets for fat cats, so we should talk more about that here soon.

Kitty Dybdall did a great presentation on cats and litterboxes.  I took notes like crazy – I really think more cats are rehomed because of litterbox issues than anything else.  One of my Life Goals is for every cat owner to get to have their cats for twenty plus years, and their (unintentional) pee antics and their peoples’ (understandable) frustrations are interfering with my Life Goal!

The Nebraska Humane Society team did a great presentation on cat grooming.  They have a handout on nail trimming that I am sure you could get if you need.

The Cat Agility Demonstration was SUPER CUTE!  Two kittens, Oreo and Twizzlers, who have been working (playing) very hard on their skills showed what they had learned on the screened in agility course.  You are very talented, Baby Cats!

My talk was on Common Medical Issues at Different Life Stages.  Even though the audience was composed of very engaged, intelligent cat people with decades of experience, I am pretty sure at one point I said “Cats are super cute.”  Wow.  Cutting edge information.  Oh well.  Very nice group of people, and they had great questions.  Here are links to the articles I gave out after.  If you want printed copies, I have more…Pretty sure I did not lose my train of thought or say “um” in any of the articles :)

Choose Your Own Adventure, Litterbox Edition, Introduction


Choose Your Own Adventure, Litterbox Edition

on Riley and James

Forty Things

on Riley and James

Max the Cat

Wuzzy Chronicles,

Thank you for including me in your awesome Cat Expo Nebraska Humane Society!  I hope tons of cats and kittens were adopted!

Happy Heartworm Free July!

Friday, July 1st, 2011








Heartworm Disease in Cats

The Good…

Cats are not a natural host for heartworms. They are infected roughly a tenth as often as dogs.

Cats on heartworm preventative medication are completely protected from heartworm disease.

The Bad…

Heartworm disease is difficult to diagnose in cats.

  • Before an infection is fulminant, sometimes there are no signs.
  • When signs appear, they are often non-specific.
  • The ELISA test detects antigens from mature female worms.  Cats usually have a low adult worm burden (typically one to three worms), so the odds of all male heartworms is pretty high.  If that occurs, the test will read as negative.
  • An antibody test is available, but can also yield false negatives.  (Back to the good for a second:  The two tests together may increase accuracy.)
  • A cardiac ultrasound can detect adult worms in or near the heart, but is much more expensive than a blood test.

I am convinced that because of all of these hurdles to diagnosis, feline heartworm disease is underdiagnosed.

At this point in time, heartworm disease in cats is untreatable. We manage secondary signs and inflammation while we wait for the adult heartworms to die, which can take several years.

The Ugly…

Cats become sick with a very low worm burden.

A common sign is difficulty breathing, which can be mistaken for asthma.

The most common sign of heartworm disease in cats is sudden death.

The End of Feline Heartworm Disease…

Every cat should be on a monthly heartworm preventative medication, even an indoor cat in Nebraska.  That the risk is relatively low would not make one bit of difference to me if Max the Cat were the one to contract heartworm disease and I could have prevented it.

Great information at American Heartworm Society’s website:

Feline Heartworm Disease

Today’s Checklist for the Finch Household:

Noodle the Poodle – Wormshield tablet

Max the Cat – topical Revolution

Give treats to the fish and Joy the Puppy, who is on ProHeart6

Hope you have a happy, healthy, minimal-mosquito heartworm-free summer!

See full size image

How Do I Love Thee?

Friday, May 27th, 2011

When we were newly married and I was trying to convince my husband that we NEEDED Max the Cat, my Mom said the words that got Max’s paw in the door. ..

“Russ, Do Not Make Her Choose.”

Russ is allergic to cats.  And guinea pigs.  And their hay.  Oh, and rats.  Mostly rats.  We have had them all.

By the time we had Fuzzy and Wuzzy (our 4th and 5th rats) he honestly could not breathe in their presence.  He just did not go into the living room, and if he did, we ended up in urgent care.  “You NEED to breathe, Finch,” I said, in a rare moment of logic over emotion.  He ended up on pretty strong allergy medications for the remainder of the rats’ lives.  He could not breathe well, and he ALWAYS felt miserable, but he did not die.

Crazy, huh?

You know what would be crazier?  If I insisted on a 6th rat…or a 6th and a 7th.  (You know, so Six wouldn’t get lonely.)

We adopted Fuzzy and Wuzzy (Hairless Dumbo Rex littermates) with the misguided hope that they would be less allergenic than their furry predecessors, ButtercupRita and Cookie.  Cookie actually ended up living with Mom and Dad because…yup, Russ could not breathe in her presence.

Fur does not cause allergic reactions.

Allergic reactions are caused by protein in dander, spit and pee.

HOW MANY years have I been telling friends and clients that very thing when they beg me to approve of their Sphinx Cat/Chinese Crested Dog-adoption-to-be because they are just sure hairless pets (or low-shedding pets, like Poodles) are hypoallergenic?  *sigh*  We were just sure hairless rats were hypoallergenic.

Not that that notion is totally misguided.  Some pets seem to cause less intense allergic reactions in people than others:  those with less hair slough less dander, are easier to keep clean and probably have a genetic predisposition to being less allergenic.


We knew better.  But we sure loved those rats.  I am grateful Russ coexisted with them for almost three years.  I will not ask him to do it again.

Thank you for not making me choose, Russ.

In honor of Russ’ kindness, I have written this poem.  My apologies to  Elizabeth Barrett Browning.  I am quite sure this is not what you meant your poem to be.

How Do I Love Thee?

How do I love thee?  Let me count the ways.

If we live sixty more years more or less

And you stay on your meds and hold your breath,

To the very end of our married days…


I love thee more than all the future pets

We’d get if we filled our house like we do–

Got one of each color or maybe two.

I’d love all these Finches-to-be, and yet…


I love thee more than all of our future pets.

We could have two or four rats at a time!

And rabbits and piggies, kittens and cats,

Just a rough guess, that’s about ninety-nine

Pets we could have were we crazy like that.

But we’re not, and I promise, I’ll be fine.

See full size image


The Complete Cat’s Meow

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

The Complete Cat’s Meow

Everything You Need to Know about Caring for Your Cat


Darlene Arden

Five Stars!


I LOVE this book! For all the wrong reasons…

The cover (by which, as you know, I judge a book) is GORGEOUS! The beautiful model is not Max the Cat, but he sure could be…

(Surprisingly, Max has never modeled professionally.)

I love the picture on the back of a cat licking his paw. And of course, I love the picture of Darlene and her beautiful Aimee Cat. Of all the many books I have read this year, this one has my very favorite cover! I am going to keep it out for that very reason.

It was written by Darlene Arden! I love her.

She mentioned me in the acknowledgements! Woo! I am in a book! Thank you Darlene!

And most of all, I love this book for all the right reasons…

It is an excellent cat resource – cat health, cat behavior, cat training (Yes! Of course!) and even cat breeds, of which I tend to be a rescue-oriented eye-rolling Max the Domestic Shorthair Orange Tabby-loving ignorer. Though, as you may have guessed, I have always secretly wanted a Sphinx.

(Even better than a Sphinx!)

I am now a reformed cat breed ignorer, and I very much loved the chapter on cat breeds and their origins and the awesomeness of each.

Throughout the book are wonderful insights into the value Darlene puts on rescue, welfare, and of course, cats themselves. Not surprising, knowing Darlene (and reading the title!) but I always love to hear from the heart of a cat lover.

I also loved learning about CAT AGILITY. That one I did not know, but I so want to start training Max now! He honestly would do quite well as he is super smart. I will let you know what I learn!

The veterinary and health information is exactly right. The pictures are super cute. The book is easy to read and will be easy to use as a quick resource. You NEED this book. You will love it, and you will learn about and appreciate your cat/cats/cats-to-be even more than you already do.

Bunny Trails: I plan on visiting all of the websites referenced in the book. Some I know, and some are new to me, but they all sound really great. Also, I am looking up the Nebraska Cat Agility Club…or maybe starting one.

Happy Heartworm-Free April!

Friday, April 1st, 2011

Wouldn’t that be something?  If we went through this entire month and NOBODY was diagnosed with heartworm disease??  We just saw another case of heartworm disease very recently…So sad.  I know I have been on an “I hate cancer” kick lately, but as always, I am on my “I hate heartworm” kick too.  (I have quite a few kicks…)  Heartworm disease is 100% preventable, and though treatable (treatable in dogs – not so much cats and ferrets), prevention is so much less expensive and easier on the dogs’ systems.I promised to be more upbeat here at Riley and James as soon as possible!  So here goes…

Today’s monthly heartworm post is on how heartworm preventative medications work!

Science…medicine…the wonders of canine physiology…heartworm examined not as a pet stealer or dog damager, but more clinically, as a very cool (disgusting) mortal, intricate parasite.  How exciting is that??  Well, I think it is exciting…

The Medicine

All heartworm preventative medications currently on the market are a form of macrocyclic lactones, medications derived from bacteria in the Streptomyces genus.  They do not prevent heartworm infection in the strictest sense, they prevent heartworm disease – they kill the larvae (L3 and L4, “baby heartworms”) before they can mature into adult worms.(Interesting side note!  Until the late 1980’s, only daily medications were available because they were only powerful enough to kill the “L3” stage, which lasts only two or three days.)Macrocyclic lactones are neurotoxins to the heartworm larvae (L3 and L4), paralyzing their mouthparts and causing them to starve to death.  The medication needs to be repeated monthly because they kill all of the parasites that are in the pet’s system that have infected him or her in the last thirty days.  The picture that came to mind when I was trying to make it understandable was one of a rainstorm.  Bear with me…Heartworm preventatives are not umbrellas – they are windshield wipers.  Your dog is continually at risk of being bitten by a mosquito that is carrying heartworm larvae (L3) – the mosquito would be the cloud and the heartworm larvae would be the raindrop…if clouds were buzzy and annoying and raindrops were potentially fatal.

The Worm

We think of heartworm preventatives as protecting our pets against heartworm disease, and they do.  But they do it more as a windshield wiper (that sweeps every thirty days) than an umbrella that is a constant barrier to infection.  Our pets are at risk of being infected by heartworm larvae – but are protected from heartworm disease that is caused by adult heartworms in the pulmonary vessels and heart.

The Disease

I think the disease should be called subcutaneous-tissue-then-pulmonary-arteries-and-if-it-is-a-really-heavy-infestation-even-right-heart-and-vena-cava-worms, but it is not.  Heartworm is too cute of a name for such a horrid disease.

That’s All I’ve Got.

If that helps you understand the pathogenesis of heartworm disease, awesome.  It helps me to be disciplined when giving heartworm preventative medication to my pets to think of it as a “windshield wiper” stopping heartworm larvae that may have already started their unholy travels to the very heart of my pets, rather than a barrier or “umbrella” that I can just put up when it is sunny and warm and just right for a heartworm attack.  If it just grosses you out, and you like being grossed out, that is good too, I suppose!

Coming Soon…More Awesome Heartworm Information of Some Sort

Let me know what other heartworm related topics you would like to cover.  Ideas…heartworm disease in cats and ferrets, treating heartworm disease, I would love a guest post from someone who has had a pet with heartworm disease, or worked in a rescue organization and dealt with heartworm disease, or any guest post with a heartworm-related story!  Let me know if you have topic ideas or would like to write a guest post here!

Today’s To Do List:
Noodle the Poodle – Wormshield tablet
Max the Cat – topical Revolution
(Joy the Puppy is on injectable Proheart 6.)

Coming Next Month…

How do injectable sustained release heartworm prevenative medications (Proheart 6 and Proheart 12) work?

Previous Happy Heartworm Free Month Posts…

January 2011

February 2011

March 2011

American Heartworm Society Website

Isn’t this FUN?


The more that you read,The more things you will know.The more that you learn,The more places you’ll go.

-Dr. Seuss

Happy Heartworm-Free February!

Tuesday, February 1st, 2011


If you give your pets heartworm preventative medication on the first…it’s the first!

Heartworm Preventative Medication

The following is a list of prescription medications available in varying combinations and permutations from your veterinarian.  (If you see any I missed, let me know and I will add them!)  Getting the weight-based dose and species correct is super important AND your veterinarian has your pet’s medical history which could impact which preventative is ideal.  So please get your veterinarian’s input in choosing which medication is best for your pet!

The brand names are listed first, with the active ingredient against heartworm disease in parenthesis.  Many of these medications also protect against other parasites.  I can add that information too if you would like!  You really only need to know which meds YOUR pet is on, but isn’t veterinary information FUN??


Heartgard Plus (ivermectin) – monthly oral medication

Iverhart Max (ivermectin) – monthly oral medication

Tri-heart Plus (ivermectin) – monthly oral medication

Wormshield (ivermectin) – monthly oral medication

Interceptor (milbemycin) – monthly oral medication

Sentinel (milbemycin) – monthly oral medication

Trifexis (milbemycin) – monthly oral medication – new!

Advantage Multi (moxidectin) – monthly topical medication

Revolution (selamectin) – monthly topical medication

Proheart 6 (moxidectin) – sustained release injectable medication, given every six months (a form given every twelve months, Proheart 12, is available in Australia and parts of Asia)


Heartgard (ivermectin) – monthly oral medication

Interceptor (milbemycin) – monthly oral medication

Advantage Multi (moxidectin) – monthly topical medication

Revolution (selamectin) – monthly topical medication


Heartgard (ivermectin) – monthly oral medication

My checklist for today:

Ebony Dog – Wormshield tablet

Noodle the Poodle – Wormshield tablet

Joy the Puppy – Proheart injection

Max the Cat – topical Revolution

Princess the Gerbil – no prophylaxis needed*

*Since Princess is not susceptible to heartworm disease, she, Max and Joy get snacks since Ebony and Noodle get oral medication so as not to feel left out, which they would all argue is MORE important than having a heartworm-free household.

Potentially Helpful Links…

#barkoutloud Heartworm Discussion Notes

Heartworm Disease on Riley and James

(This one was written when I treated the dogs seasonally and poor Max the Cat not at all – now I treat everyone year-round!)

Heartworm Disease and Omaha Pets – Wuzzy Chronicles

American Heartworm Society Website

Coming Soon to The Riley and James Heartworm Series!

March 2011…Safety of heartworm preventative medication – Is it safe to give my Collie heartworm preventative medication?  Why is Joy the Puppy getting Proheart but not the old dogs?  Are some pets developing heartworm preventative medication resistance?  Are there valid drug-free options for preventing heartworm disease?  If you have other questions or concerns, let me know, and we will address those too!

(Do not wait until next month’s post if you need to know the answers to these questions now – ask me or ask your local vet – do not worry about spoiling the surprise!)

April 2011…How do these medications work?

May, June, July…I have not planned that far ahead!  What do YOU want to know about heartworm disease??  THAT is what we will talk about!

Happy Heartworm Disease Free Year!

Saturday, January 1st, 2011

I should say something profound, on this, the first day of 2011.

Maybe this is SO simple that it is REALLY, REALLY profound.

One of my goals this year is to remind everyone to give their pets their heartworm preventative every month.  (We give the dogs and Max theirs on the first, so that is when reminders will go out!  I am willing to give you personalized reminders on a different day if you prefer…and a hug*, for being as heartworm obsessed as me!)

Today, Joy the Puppy, Ebony Dog and Noodle the Poodle got their oral Wormshield (ivermectin, like Heartgard).  Several excellent oral monthly preventatives are available, as are topical preventatives.  Your pet may also be on the twice a year injectable preventative, Proheart.  Next month, I will post a list of available preventatives, if it would be helpful.  If your veterinarian prescribed it, it is good!

Next month, Joy the Puppy is switching to Proheart.

Max the Cat is on the monthly topical heartworm preventative Revolution.

We have no ferrets, but if we did, they would be on the oral heartworm preventative Heartgard, mostly because it is the only one labelled for ferrets, but also because it is an excellent product.

This post is sort of spur of the moment, as in, I jumped up from dinner and said “Oh yeah, it’s the first!” and Abby and I got the pets their meds.  Next month, I will cover heartworm disease more comprehesivly with links and pictures – NOT of a heart with worms floating out of its valves – that is so gross, and so last millinium! I will also cover whatever aspects of heartworm disease that you would like to hear, so let me know!

These days, it seems most pet owners are very well educated about heartworm disease – If there is a barrier to care, it is convenience of medicating. So we will talk about the monthly preventatives and a bit about Proheart, the once every six month medication, and join hands* and thank God that heartworm disease is preventable and that the preventative medication is no longer only available in ONCE EVERY SINGLE DAY form!

*If you prefer, we can leave hugs and hand holding out of all future medical discussions.  I just thought it would be nice.

Epic “No” – Don’t Shoot the Cat

Friday, December 10th, 2010

Friends have been asking me pet welfare questions online.  They ask darkly hilarious questions knowing the answer is “no.”  They know me well enough to make me laugh and stop way before they make me cry.


Q:  Can I dip my dog in bleach to treat his fleas?

A:  No.

In July of 2010, the University of Nebraska at Lincoln Extension Office released a seven page paper, in print and online:

Feral Cats and Their Management


Aaron M. Hildreth, Stephen M. Vantassel and Scott E. Hygnstrom

I wish the authors had thought to play the very fun Ask the Vet a Welfare Question Game with me, or any veterinarian for that matter.  I also wish they were trying to be darkly hilarious.  Sadly, they were not.

I have e-mails sent to the three authors of the publication.

Subject:  WITW (That’s how I say THAT) were you thinking?!?

I am hoping they would still like to play “Ask the Vet a Welfare Question” with me.  After they play, research more recent literature, consult the AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association), the AAHA (American Animal Hospital Association), the AAFP (American Association of Feline Practitioners), perhaps even their “neighbors” the Nebraska Humane Society, which is doing a stellar job carrying out a successful Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) program in Omaha and surrounding areas, they could write a new Opposite Report.  I would even be willing to help them write it.

Here are some “Ask The Vet a Welfare Question” questions that I think would be fun.  I also included my answers, because they are not always as obvious to everyone as I had thought!

Q:  As members of a respected university, one that invests heavily in training the veterinarians of the future, should we suggest shooting cats in the head as a potential tool in an integrated pest management program?

A:  No.

Q: Shooting cats in the heart?

A:  No.

Q:  The lungs?

A:  No.

Q:  Padded jaw foothold traps?  Snares?  Body-gripping traps?

A.  No.  No.  No.

Q:  Should we have consulted the 2007 AVMA Guidelines on Euthanasia before publishing this paper?

A:  Yes.

Q:  Should we have glanced at Nebraska euthanasia laws?

A:  Yes.

Q:  Would the American Animal Hospital Association or American Association of Feline Practitioners or Nebraska Humane Society have been good resources?

A:  Yes.  Yes.  Yes.

Q:  Should we have consulted one of the many, many veterinarians, veterinary team members and others with an interest in animal welfare, whose hackles are now up (figuratively speaking) before we made them angry?

A:  Yes.

Q:  Should one of us have walked down the hallway and consulted one of the many fine veterinary professors on East Campus before publishing our report?

A:  Yes.

Q:  Should we have listened to the leadership of Husker Cats, the feline welfare group that cares for feral cats on the UNL campus when they explained their TNR/feline health program directly to us?

A:  Yes.

Q:  What if I was too busy to do all that research, would it have been ok to just ask my veterinarian while I was in with my huntin’ dog what he thought about feral cat control?

A:  Yes.

Q:  Can we have a do-over?

A:  I don’t know.  Maybe.


I hesitated to publish this in the hopes that the UNL extension publication would just pass quietly into the abyss.  It seems as though it will not though, and even if it were about to, I really could not let it just pass without saying something.

To the authors’ credit, they have brought up and given us another opportunity to discuss a very important topic:  feral cat control.  Let me know what you think.  If you promise to be nicer to them than they suggest we be to the cats, I will also help you contact the authors.

Blogathon 2010- Two Halves (of a Black Lab) Make a Whole, Right?

Saturday, November 13th, 2010


Russ Finch, my super awesome husband, agreed to write a guest post for Blogathon 2010, and instead of (wisely) waiting till two am when I will be tired and ready for a break, I am putting his post in NOW because I love it (and him…and not only because he always says “yes, I suppose we have room for one more pet!”)

from Russ…


I’m pretty sure I will always have a cat.

I’m pretty sure I will always have a poodle.Benji with baby Amanda


These are two realities that I never envisioned before I became the husband of a veterinarian.

Now, here I am with one cat – Max, currently one poodle – Noodle, a guinea pig – Piggy, a gerbil – Princess, a rat – Wuzzy and two lab mixes – Ebony and Joy.  We have had three other poodles, one other dog, four other rats, an iguana, briefly had a snake, have fostered one dog and many baby kittens, borrowed birds and even a goat.  I do not live on a farm.

When I was a kid, our neighbor had Labrador Retrievers, trained as hunting dogs.  They would have puppies every couple of years and I begged my mom for one each time.  My mom, sensibly, said that we already had two dogs so there was just no way we could have more pets.  So, I decided that when I was a grown-up, I would have a lab.  No other pets necessary.

Our first pet as a family was Max the cat.  Shawn said we should adopt this cat from Iowa State, where he was a blood donor for the vet school hospital.  I said no, I want a lab, not a cat.  See, the cat we had growing up would not predisposition anyone to having a cat.  She was not nice and I have a scar on my upper lip to prove it.  I am allergic to cats. I am a dog person. You can’t play fetch or tug-o-war with cats. They don’t learn tricks.  Dr Finch said please.  Well, Max has been with us ever since.  He is the best cat I have ever known and will always be the pet that I am most attached to.

Next up was a dog.  Now, poodles are about as un-Labrador as dogs get.  Old poodles with no teeth especially.  Dr. Finch, in her first year of practice, met this dog, Benji.  He would come in with his nice little old lady (that’s who owns poodles you know) and jump into the doctor’s arms.  He was a very nice little poodle.  Of course, this nice lady came in with Benji and sadly declared that he would need a new home when she had to move into a nursing home.  I said we could make some fliers.  I said we could ask around.  We knew some little old ladies at church, maybe they could use a poodle.  I said we had to get a house, then we could get a dog (Lab, not Poodle).  Dr. Finch said please.  Benji was part of our family later that week.  He was goofy and loveable, but not too cuddly.  That is until our daughter Amanda was born.  Benji, like in the picture above, wanted to be as close to his baby as possible.  He was this amazing little dog that will forever be in my heart as a part of our family.

These two pets came into our lives as a young married couple and have been such an integral part of our lives.  I cannot picture a world without Max or Benji.  Sometimes I am afraid of the precedent that they set.  Dr. Finch still says please and I still can’t resist.  Sometimes I am more susceptible to pet acquisition than she is.  Luckily, Max will not allow any permanent cat additions and Omaha will not allow more than the three dogs we have, and I have a great prescription allergy  medicine for the cat, rat, dog, piggy, etc. allergies.  We joke about our zoo with each other and with our friends.  It can be kinda fun to see people’s reactions to our list of pets.  All of our pets have been unique and amazing.  Each pet has had tremendous influence on our lives.  Each pet we have lost over the years has been missed, mourned and remembered with love and joy.

Bottom line: I will always have a cat and I will always have a poodle and I will probably always have way too many other pets too.  The bonds that we have share with our animals have greatly enriched our lives.  I am proud to be a part of this blog-athon and proud of the work that my wife, Dr. Finch, is doing.  The cause here is to raise money for Bradyn to acquire an epilepsy service dog.  Service dogs take this bond that we have had with our pets to a whole different level.  It is my hope that he meets his “Max” or “Benji” very soon.


Clicking here will bring you to the webpage with information about Bradyn and an opportunity to donate towards the training of his service dog from 4 Paws for Ability. ♥