Posts Tagged ‘Dawg Business’

What’s New?

Friday, July 8th, 2011

Hi!  What’s new?

I feel as though my poor website has taken a back seat of late and I have not gotten to interact with you all here much.  I did not mean to show up here so infrequently!  Here are some highlights from my past few weeks!

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I attended a Beth Moore event with my Mom-in-law, Karen, which was wonderful.  One of the absolute highlights of the weekend was this cat painted on the parking garage near Pershing Auditorium in downtown Lincoln:

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My girls attended Camp Kindness at Nebraska Humane Society, which was, as always, awesome.

While we were there, we accidently met a baby Chinese Crested puppy and her two equally adorable brothers.  She was throwing toys at her brothers’ heads and dancing around in a happy I-am-just-the-greatest dance.  Her mini dress says “Major Attitude.”  My friend called this the Princess and the Pea picture.  :)  That is her equally cute, more furry brother to the left of her.  HE has been adopted.  I do not know if she or her other brother or their Mama have yet.

Must. Resist. Puppy.

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The awesome Jana Rade of Dawg Business published this post I wrote on xylitol toxicity:

Xylitol and the Basset Hound

Xylitol is an artificial sweetener present in many products, most notably some sugar-free gums.  After the scare with this poor dog, we do not even allow xylitol into our house anymore!

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My weekly articles at Life With Dogs are up and running…

Life with Dogs

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The CareFRESH Blog is up and running too…

CareFRESH Blog

Any small pet health topics you would like to see covered?

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Veterinary Economics published my story about Joy the Puppy missing her Ebony Dog, which is neat to see in print, but brings up all of my (still pretty raw) sadness over Eb.

Do Pets Mourn?

Joy’s eyes are still intermittantly baldy-bald, and we are still all moping around, but we are doing ok!

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Next month, Veterinary Economics is publishing my post on how to make a Veterinary Pen Holder!

That will be lighter, and a fun article.  Pretty silly!

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Tomorrow, I am speaking at the Nebraska Humane Society Cat Expo at noon.  When I do public speaking, I tend to drool and stammer and mumble and talk so fast I am done in ten seconds instead of one hour and trip over my own feet standing still (or at least I feel like I do).  So that should be fun for everyone.

Nebraska Humane Society Cat Expo

If you are in Omaha, come if you can!  A cat behaviorist, Kitty Dybdall,  is speaking at 10 am, which I am very excited about, and a CAT AGILITY TRAINER, Jill Archibald, is doing demonstrations!  I am SO excited to see that!

Hope you are having a wonderful summer!

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Happy Heartworm-Free May!

Saturday, April 30th, 2011

January

February

March

April

Actually we have had two cases of heartworm disease this spring, which is really discouraging.  Another sobering fact – last year Banfield Pet Hospital diagnosed over 5000 cases of heartworm disease in dogs!  I did not hear how many cases were treated or how the dogs did, but FIVE THOUSAND!  Granted, there are 750 + Banfields across the country, but that is still so many for a disease that is 100% preventable.  As a community of pet people, we can do so much better.  The number will not be zero this year (It will be at least two) but I hope it is WAY lower than 5000!

This month’s topic…

Proheart 6

Where does Proheart 6 fit into the world of heartworm preventative medication?

Proheart 6 is an injectable sustained release medication labeled for dogs only (not cats or ferrets).  Its active ingredient is moxidectin, which, like the heartworm larvae killing component of all of the oral and topical preventatives available, is a macrocyclic lactone.  Moxidectin is also found in Advantage Multi, a combination topical heartworm-flea preventative that is applied monthly.  Proheart 6 is also labeled to treat hookworms.

Why is Proheart 6 only given every six months?

The moxidectin in Proheart 6 is in a sustained release formula, which means medication is constantly released over several months.  It stays in the dog’s body at therapeutic levels for six months, after which it tapers off to levels that are both ineffective to kill heartworm larva and are also safe when combined with another full dose.

Will Proheart 6 save the world?

No.

Pfizer recommends that veterinarians not give Proheart to dogs who are too thin, dogs who are ill, puppies under six months of age, and dogs who have not had Proheart before the age of seven.  If they have had Proheart before the age of seven, they may then have it at any age.  They also recommend that Proheart not be given to dogs who have allergic dermatitis.  Generally, allergic dermatitis includes any allergies, food, inhalant, or contact allergies that manifest as itching or skin problems.  Reactions to Proheart may occur.

Who should be on Proheart 6?

Every other dog, unless he or she has issues your veterinarian has deemed incompatable with injectable moxidectin, should be considered for Proheart 6.  I really think this is a great tool in the fight against heartworm disease.  Joy the Puppy had her first dose of Proheart 6 on February 1, 2011 and has done great.

Things to consider when deciding whether to use Proheart 6:

  • Proheart 6 is an injection given every six months (thus the clever name).  You have two chances a year to space giving your pets’ heartworm preventative instead of twelve!
  • Even better, the responsibility, at least in part, for remembering your pets’ heartworm preventative switches from you to your veterinary team!  You will receive a reminder when the time for Proheart is approaching, and the visit itself will be a quick one, or incorporated with a biannual wellness exam you would already have planned.
  • The cost of Proheart tends to be similar to that of monthly topical and oral heartworm preventative medications.
  • You will not be tempted to flout the American Heartworm Society‘s year-round heartworm prevention recommendations and guess at future weather patterns  and presence of mosquitoes in those iffy (AND VERY DANGEROUS AS HEARTWORM RISK GOES!) spring and fall seasons, as the twice yearly Proheart administration will protect your pet all year.
  • You could put a box of chocolates for yourselves on that safe-from-pets tip-top shelf where you used to keep the box of heartworm preventatives.

Great Heartworm Posts I Have Read This Month:

“Reading About Heartworm is One Thing, Watching a Dog Suffer is Another” – guest post by Pet Saver Ashley on Dawg Business by Jana Rade

“Don’t Let Heartworm Become Heartbreak” – guest post by Awesome Veterinarian Lorie A. Huston on Dawg Business by Jana Rade

…And maybe the best, and also the most discouraging, heartworm post I have read this month is on heartworm preventative resistance:

Heartworm Prevention for Dogs:  New Concepts and Concerns – by Lorie A. Huston, DVM on her website, Pet Health Care Gazette

Yes, heartworm preventative resistance does indeed seem to be a reality in a very, very small portion of the dog population…*sigh*  I was hoping it was not.  But I trust Dr. Blagburn, one of the very best veterinary parasitologist in the world – I have always very much admired his work, and I trust Dr. Huston…It sure looks as if it is true.  All the more reason to be neurotically vigilant about heartworm prevention…And because Proheart is so easy and convenient, you can be vigilant without being neurotic…if you want.

Tomorrow’s Checklist…

Noodle the Poodle – Wormshield tablet

Max the Cat – topical Revolution

(Joy the Puppy is on injectable Proheart 6.  Perhaps I will spend the few saved minutes reading her this post.  Naw, I will give her a cookie!)