Posts Tagged ‘Veterinary Economics Leadership Series’

Mayo Clinic – Book Review

Monday, March 21st, 2011

Management Lessons from Mayo Clinic – Inside One of the World’s Most Admired Service Organizations

by

Leonard L. Berry, PhD.

and

Kent D. Seltman, PhD.

Five Stars!

✩✩✩✩✩

This is a really good book about Mayo Clinic, an organization I previously knew nothing about.  And THAT is my favorite thing about it – learning so much about <Mayo Clinic>.  I love to learn.

The cover isn’t awesome.  It is red, white, blue and yellow, but I have not been wearing my fuzzy red mittens in this warm spring weather, so I did not need something to coordinate with them.  I was going to say “Look how much I have matured over this year, no longer judging a book by its cover…” but I just spent an entire paragraph on the cover, so I will not say that.  Maybe next year…

Dr. Berry is a marketing professor and author, and Dr. Seltman was the director of marketing at Mayo Clinic from 1992 to 2006, so they know that of which they write.  They keep the book professional and structured in such a way that even those in fields other than healthcare can extract leadership lessons from the book.  However, the best parts of the book (as is often true) are the stories and pictures.  Even in their strict professionalism, they capture well the love doctors, nurses, support staff, patients and families have for Mayo Clinic, and I loved reading about that.

The history of Mayo Clinic is fascinating.  (Yes!  New thing!  I’m a history buff.)  Dr. Mayo and his two sons started the clinic over a century ago on a solid, medically and ethically sound foundation from which the clinic, now on three campuses and associated with all sorts of other health care partnerships and health care websites, has seemed to stay very true, which is super impressive.

I also loved learning about the excellence of the present-day doctors of Mayo Clinic.  They have to be team players to make it.  Very persuasive cases were made for the validity of standardized procedures and evidence-based medicine, which are big parts of Mayo Clinic.  The typical Mayo doctor is truly on the cutting edge of medicine.  Many of them lead within the organization and research and teach.  That is the part of the book that was most challenging to me as a veterinarian and that will stay with me the longest I would guess.  We as veterinarians have much to learn from our human MD friends, and as often as I can put my scruff down and accept that, I come away a better doctor.

*****

This fits nowhere in a professional book review, as is a subpoint of a subpoint in the book, so I will put it here anyways, because it is too awesome not to mention, and it was one of the first things to really cheer me up during this sad season of Finch pet loss…

As you know, I am unhealthfully obsessed with the show Scrubs.  In one particularly tasteless gag, J.D. tells a family their grandfather has passed away while he is dressed as a clown.

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That really happened in Real Life!  It is in the book!

It was casual Friday…It was Halloween…A doctor was celebrating, as was the rest of the hospital…I will apologize now to the grown grandchildren to whom this happened and who are now dealing with more severe clown phobias than the rest of us, but I am still laughing, and I read that section a month ago.  It is just too horrible to take seriously, and not, as the book authors propose, a valid argument against casual Fridays.  I am quite sure it has never happened before or since.

*****

I honestly can say I agree with the rest of the book and will read it again to find more parallels to my veterinary life.  Whether you are in an entirely different profession, are a veterinarian, or are a realhumanmedical doctor, What in the world are we supposed to call you guys?? …um…you will enjoy and learn from this book.

(B&G Tasty Foods kept a couple of these clown oil paintings from the original restaurant and let me take a picture for my 24 clock project of Blogathon 2010.  In the original post, I cropped the clown out to protect you. I think it fits nicely with the clown paragraph of this book review, though.  The sandwiches at B&G are so good they are worth the clown night terrors you will have for weeks after.)

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Coming Soon to Riley and James…

Do Pets Mourn?  The Story of Joy the Puppy and Ebony Dog

Happy Heartworm-Free April

Happier Posts…

A friend has asked when I will return to my normal, more upbeat posts here…I am working on it Georgia Little Pea!

Summary of the 25 Veterinary Economics Leadership books – two books to finish!  Woo!  This has been such a fun project!

And Elsewhere…

I have taken a break from my monthly column at Omaha.net, but I do miss it.  Genius idea to name the column after a mortal pet.

The Wagging Tail

This is a collaborative blog to which I contribute about once a month.  I think it is time to get back on the ball here as well!

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